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of the working man's life. >> they seem to be doing that in some states. >> not allowing union bosses to compel them to write checks from their paychecks. where they don't belong. >> front page of all the papers. controversial right-to-work measures will soon be the law of the land in michigan. republican governor rick snider signed the law despite wide protests at the capitol. the law will make it illegal for a union employee to pay union dues as a condition of their employment. >> let's explain that. just for half a second. then we'll go on. right to work, what does it mean? people ask me, what does it mean? it means unions can force somebody to pay them if they want to get a job in the state of michigan. >> well, what it means is, if you get a job, the union extracts money from your paycheck for the dues for union dues. >> well, yeah. >> automatically. >> automatically. >> you've got no choice. oh, you want to work here? well, you've got to pay us. >> right. >> what if i don't want to pay you? what if i don't want to support the candidates you support? what if they're the antithesis of my va
protecting nonunion workers from being forced to pay union dues. welcome to "america live," everyone, i'm allison cam rat to in for megyn kelly today. the bill could be signed by the governor as early as tomorrow. pro-union protesters responding with shouts of "shame on you" from the gallery as huge crowds mass on the state capitol grounds. we understand police are ready with riot gear in case things turn ugly. thousands of union supporters have been at the statehouse since early today stomping their feet, chanting, as you can hear there, one union boss saying, quote: we're going to take you on and take you out. nearby an angry confrontation breaking out. union protesters apparently storming the tent of the local chapter of conservative group americans for prosperity, tearing it down and then going after some right-to of work supporters -- right-to-work supporters. let's watch this. in -- >> shut your mouth! shut your mouth, i wasn't talking to you! you put your hands on me, see what happens. shut up! shut your mouth. [bleep] >> hey, hey! >>> lien -- [bleep] >> you guys are knocking the
-controlled senate. many in the union movement say he will become another scott walker referring to the wisconsin governor who had very heated relations with unions and that led to a recallest that famed but it soured relations to this day. the fallout which all of this in lansing. >>guest: it is nothing like it was with governor walker because this was not on his agenda. this is the scene outside his office, the romney office building, the george romney office building which, perhaps, you can see named after someone who you know better, his son, where the governor's office is and where the last of the protesters are holed up. perhaps you can see state patrol officers. from early today it looked crazy at times with some union member whose sport the law, the sign was torn down by other union members who are opposed. most of folks now are calmed down and nothing at all like wisconsin where the protests went on for days. where it stands now both of these bills have passed. there is one public sector bill and one private sector bill, right-to-work bill, and they both passed. one has to be reconsidere
. >> twenty-five years ago the u.s. and the soviet union signed a treaty which removed thousands of nuclear missiles from europe. former reagan administration officials talk about the negotiations that led to the intermediate nuclear forces treaty. at this event hosted by the american foreign service association, it's an hour 20 minutes. >> okay. i think we're ready to go. i would invite everyone to take their seats. i'd like to wish all a very good morning. i'm susan johnson, the president of afsa, and i'd like to extend a very warm afsa welcome to you all, and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion, and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing the inf treaty. special thanks of course go to our panelists and our moderator, and i should not talk, ridgway and burt, for sharing their experiences and reflections surrounding the conflict negotiations that led to this treaty which was a significant factor in reducing danger of the cold war. i'm sure you know all of these three eminent folks, but i would just like to say a quick word. ambassador rozanne
it be michigan which used to call itself the worker's paradise union state is now moving towards new anti-union right-to-work legislation and it looks like it's going to pass? but first up, budget talks resume between speaker john boehner and president obama today. with just 25 days to go, let's keep tabs on where we stand. reports of a conservative backlash against speaker boehner simply not true. he has the solid support of his leadership and the rank and file. but there is concern among some in the gop that they are at risk of becoming the party for rich people while president obama and democrats stake their claim on the middle class. and my tax rate flexibility with higher -- here's what the president said earlier today. >> i'm not going to sign any package that somehow prevent prevents the top rate from going up for folks at the top 2%. but i do remain optimistic that we can get something done that is good for families like this one and that is good for the american economy. >> we look back republican senator rand paul from the state of kentucky. senator paul, welcome, as always. i want to
, over in michigan thousands of union members and supporters are protesting at the state capitol building in lancing. the state, which is the heart of the united autoworkers and ground zero for union rights is poised to sign a major anti-labor bill into law today. the president weighed in on that, speaking yesterday in redford. >> these right to work clause, they don't have anything with economics. they have everything to do with politics. what they're really talking about is giving you the right to work for less money. america is not going to compete based on low skill, low wage, no workers rights. that's not our competitive advantage. there's always going to be some other country that can treat its workers even worse. >> the house speaker, john boehner, is speaking now on the house floor regarding the fiscal cliff. let's take a listen. >> beyond 1:50 p.m. today. >> the speaker of the house for five minutes. >> the speaker, last week republicans made a serious offer to avert the fiscal cliff, and most of it was based on testimony given last year by president clinton's former chief of sta
what he says "storage wars" are doing to deceive you. in michigan angry union members attacked a tent set up by supports. as the tent came crashing down people were still inside. aphrase, scared. and we'll talk with one of them just ahead. questions? anyone have occasional constipation, diarrhea, gas, bloating? yeah. one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues with three strains of good bacteria. approved! [ female announcer ] live the regular life. phillips'. megyn: moment ago police gave an update on the deadly mall shooting, release the name victims, the name of the short and explaining how oh got the gun. >> is name is jacob tyler roberts. he was born march 16, 1990. based on all the evidence we have gathered so far it appears he did dive a self-inflicted gunshot wound. we are also repaired to release a -- we are also prepared to release additional information about the suspect. he was armed with an ar-15 semiautomatic rifle. the rifle was stolen yesterday from a person known as a suspect. at the time of the ateak what is wearing a
actually lose. this afternoon in detroit, the president blasted a package of anti-union bills. michigan republicans, governor, is ush pushing through his state's legislature. >> what we shouldn't do, i just got to say this, what we shouldn't be doing is trying to take away your rights to bargain for better wages and working conditions. >> even though the cheering went on for nearly half a minute, it looks like those anti-union bills may, in fact, have enough support to pass michigan's legislature, despite union threats of massive demonstrations. cnn's alison kosik is in the capital, lance, watching what's going on. explain what the fight is all about, why it's so intense. >> reporter: well, first of all, here at the michigan state capit capital, it's more about the calm before the storm. those demonstrations of thousands of people descending on the state capitol. police are gearing up for what's coming up tomorrow when the votes are expected to happen. what this is all about is the right to work law. if this law passes, what it essentially means is that workers would not be required to
amendment defining marriage as the union of one man and one woman. we aflawed the citizens of the majority of states which have enshrined in their constitutions the traditional concept of marriage, and we support the campaigns under way in several other states to do so. and take a look at what the republican candidate mitt romney said back in may about his opposition to not only gay marriage, but even civil unions. let's watch. >> i think people have differing views on marriage, and i respect people's different views. when i served as governor of my state, this issue arose, same-sex marriage and civil union. i pointed out that i'm in favor of traditional marriage between a man and a woman and i don't favor civil union or gay marriage. >> clark, your party is so far right on this issue, they're not going to do anything about doma, they want to put it in the constitution you can never have a same-sex marriage. >> it's not going to happen. >> why are they putting it in the platform? >> that is a problem. this is what we fought against this summer in tampa. what did happen in that committee in
-to-work legislation. bob king, united autoworkers president yesterday. >> i think that unions -- i think things like this are waking the sleeping giant. working families are tired of losing. they want a fair share of the prosperity of this state and this country and i think that's going to help build the union movement. >> stephanie: yeah. i love the republican house speaker. this is about freedom. fairness and equality. these are basic american rights, rights that should unite us. that's why we did this behind closed doors with no referendum because we knew it would unite us. >> freedom for ceos. >> stephanie: michigan's future has never been brighter because workers are free. >> free to live on the streets. >> stephanie: yes. >> in winter. >> stephanie: ah yes. senator carl levin of michigan. >> he has a responsibility as governor of avoiding this kind of a cliff. it is not -- it's not good enough we told him -- for him to say that he would like to get this behind us. >> stephanie: he went on to say -- the senator
boomers 15 years away from retiring and i don't have the luxury of the soviet union falling. the recipes that worked in the late 1990's worked. they don't work now. we have a different set of problems. host: from new york city, democrat blind, go ahead. caller: thank you for taking my call. even if we go over the fiscal cliff, we need a bigger plan because it does not even balance the budget. i don't think we really have a supply-side problem. they talk about cutting taxes on the right and i think there are so many people out of work and i think you need to get these people to work. i just think we have a demand issue, not a supply issue. if you're out of work, you cannot pay taxes. guest: he is exactly right -- no one is talking about a fiscal cliff that will solve the problem. there is no grand bargain being discussed except in the most general outline terms. there is enough to be -- nothing close to being politically acceptable. we're only talking of something of that will allow people to get through this. in the short term, we need to have fiscal policy that may get the deficit highe
which until this election was a predominantly republican-voting phenomena, and those in union city, new jersey, um, who have, you know, electorally expressed themselves via the democratic party. and a lot of that dose to who en-- goes to who engaged them when they showed up and cultivated their political activity and included them in the political activity that was going on at that time in those communities. so i think there's a lot to be said for viewing the influence of latinos in this cycle and particularly going forward as part of a broader coalition. um, and one that, you know, i've heard time and time again everybody likes, republicans love to go back to the reagan quote. the national exit polls this year shouldn't give you a lot of comfort. >> right. >> it's, you know, two-thirds support for abortion rights, 60% support for the affordable care act. um, the almost 59% support for same-sex marriage. those are, this is among hispanics in the national exit poll. that doesn't sound particularly socially conservative to me. >> no. >> so -- >> and, and also the question i think at some
this town. >> we have no words to add to this story. thank you for watching "state of the union." i'm candy crowley in washington. head to cnn.comotu for analysis and extras. if you missed any part of today's show, find us on itunes. just search "state of the union." fareed zakaria is next from here and parts of the united states. >>> this is gps, the global public square. welcome to you around the states and the world, i'm fareed zakaria. we have a very important show. first up, with washington as an impasse, an exclusive conversation with unof america's greatest deal makers. james bake eric former secretary of state, former secretary of treasury, former white house chief of staff on how to stay off the fiscal cliff and on what his party should learn from the last election. >>> next, when the u.s. aimed high in the 1960s, we sent a man to the moon. with a similar effort, we can now cure cancer. that whees the head of the largest cancer center in the world, houston's m.d. anderson says. you want to hear why we're so close to success and yet so far. >>> and merge has lost its numb were one s
of the union, i'm candy crowley in washington. if you missed any part of today's show, find us on i-tu s i-tunes, just search state of the union. fareed zakaria gps is next. >>> this is gps, the global public square, welcome to all of you in the united states, and around the world, i'm far reez zakaria, we have a very important show for you today. first up today w washington at an impasse, a conversation with one of america's greetest deal makers, james baker, former secretary of state, former secretary of the treasury, fovrmer white house chief of staff on how to stay off the fiscal cliff and what the party should learn from the last election. >>> next, when the u.s. aimed high in the 1960s, we sent a man to the moon w the same effort, we can now cure cancer, that's what the head of the largest cancer center in the word, m.d. anderson says. >>> and america has lost it's number one standing in lotts of areas, from competitiveness to education, the new number one in most cases a scandinavian country, what is the credit sauce? we'll dig into it. but first here's my take. as we debate whether
for insured depository institution and the ncua for credit unions provides unlimited insurance for noninterest-bearing accounts at banks and credit unions. these transaction accounts are used by businesses, local governments, hospitals, and other nonprofit organizations for payroll and other recurrent expenses. and this program provides certainty to businesses in uncertain times. these accounts are also important to our nation's smallest financial institutions. in fact, 90% of community banks with assets under $10 billion have tag deposits. this program allows these institutions to serve the banking needs of the small businesses in their communities, keeping deposits local. in my state of south dakota, i know that the tag program is important to banks, credit unions, and small businesses. our nation's economy is certainly in a different place than it was in 2008 at the height of the financial crisis when this program was created. but with concerns about the fiscal cliff and continued instability in european markets, i believe a temporary extension is needed. therefore, i believe a clean two-ye
process, play? as the soviet union teetered toward an end to? >> i am not sure it had that much direct effect. i would say that ending the arms race, because this was the beginning of ending the arms race and you know it really took the s.t.a.r.t. treaty and a series of others to do so, and it took the liberation of eastern europe and, which went as a separate process. but, i would say that these things actually freed up gorbachev to try to reform the system. it took the pressure off of him. as long as we had the arms race, they had an excuse not for changing the system, but once you and the cold war, not just the arms race, and gorbachev ended it ideologically december 7, 1988, today is also an anniversary of that -- exactly a year after he signed the inf treaty, what he ended in that speech aside from announcing unilateral reductions in their military, was he discarded the class struggle as the rationale for soviet foreign-policy. that was the rationale that also cut the khan eunice party as the dictatorship in the country. so the end of the cold war reforms that gorbachev started th
unions opposed the move, and last week, senator bernie sanders and several of his colleagues called on chairman genachowski to hold off. bernie sanders is an outspoken opponent of media consolidation. he sees it as a threat to democracy. once the mayor of burlington, vermont, he served 16 years in the house of representatives and was recently re-elected to his second term in the senate. he's the longest serving independent in the history of congress. he was in new york earlier this week and we met for this interview. welcome. good to see you again. >> good to be with you, bill. >> this is a strong letter, inspired one of your colleagues in the senate says, by you. what's the beef? >> what the chairmanf the fcc is now talking about is making a bad situation much worse by loosening up the cross-ownwnersp rules, which means now that a media giant, one of the big companies, whether it's murdoch's news corp. or anyone else, will be able to own major television stations, a newspaper, and radio stations within a given community. and that means people are jujus not going to be hearing diffe
jobs. >> the legislation means public and private sector workers in michigan won't have to join a union or pay union dues if they choose not to. >>> a massive gas line explosion jolted people in their homes. saying it felt like a plane crash. the 70-foot wall of fire destroyed four homes near charleston, west virginia. five other homes were also damaged. this fire was so intense, you can see it right there. damaged an interstate, several people were treated for smoke inhalation. >>> ravi shankar has died. he passed away tuesday after undergoing heart valve replacement surgery. 92 years old and a legend for 50 years. shankar and george harrison teamed up for the concert for bangladesh. his daughter, singer norah jones. he did the score for the movie "ga "ghandi." really recognizable. >>> let's get back to the top stories. investigators still trying to figure out the shooter at an oregon's mall motives. let's talk with someone in the mall. alexis, a terrifying day yesterday. how are you doing? >> hi, there. still recovering this morning. still a little shaken up and can't believe this act
strongly urging the european union to designate them as a terrorist organization. the response that we got was unacceptable, in the sense that it laid out a whole series of bureaucratic reasons or hurdles that would have to be surmounted to do that. i do not think it should be acceptable to us, ever. in the coming days, i and senator lieberman and senator rich will introduce code resolution with the same message that we sent to catherine ashjian -- a resolution with the same message that we sent to catherine ashton. bashar al-assad is a key link. efforts to support moderate forces opposing him within syria should be considered now and considered seriously. i have recently called for a more robust u.s. response to the crisis in syria. i believe that a political transition to a government that reflects the will of the syrian people is also in the core security interest of united states and the region. moreover, this change would align with our values of supporting the democratic process and the basic rights and freedom that should be enjoyed by all people, regardless of religion, ethnicity,
't be able to appreciate. they had this union, i suppose, where they circled each other, he observed her and she observed him. when she died at the age of 24 on april 17, 1680, immediately after her death her body was transfigured and there are a two witness accounts which were part of her cause, she has already passed away at 24 and a recluse and only had a couple female friends that knew her really well, and she started affecting substantial yours, women in childbirth and that sort of thing and would apply dirt to her grave for pieces of her clothing and burner garments and make tea out of it and drink it, these miracles kept up until about 1760 when the english took canada back or took canada from the french and everything ceased, the jesuits were exelled, they were really suppressed and came back in 1840s and in the 1840s discovered her, had some of the manuscripts out of the archives and rekindled this interest in her and she started affecting yours. the miracle that prompted the pope to canonize her, 2005-2006, a native american in the state of washington, playing basketball, hit h
's the inaugural address going to be like, what's the state of the union going to be like, and what's the budget going to be like? because if they decide that they are going to be able to run over the house republicans for the next two years, you're going to see very dramatic demands that are different than if in fact they are facing a group prepared to fight them. >> but this does real damage to the economy and to millions of people if going over the cliff. this is not an abstraction. you could begin a recession. and senator durbin's idea in and the polls support him that the republicans will own this recession will last about one month, because presidents own recessions. presidents own dramatic improvements in things. we live in the obama era. not the john boehner era. >> the other thing, john, is the potential political blood that could be spilled. if the president gets tax hikes, which he can do, a couple of different ways. he could muscle this through by the end of the year. then all of a sudden you face another debt ceiling debate, where the republicans can use that to try to extract conce
black the courage to take on the school board committee teachers union, the academic elites, news media, entertainment culture. when we ceded ground which has crippled the country sandor standing and part of what we've done with alice sent in my case and writing novels to get across the american people as a country worth knowing and you know it by learning its history. he become an american. can claim genetic patterns, geographies. somalia, china, mexico. in calista's case, her parents came, her grandparents came from switzerland and poland and in my case from places like scotland and ireland. you can learn to be an american. to do that, you have to learn to be an american. do you have an academic elites and news media elite who were opposed to teaching how to be an american company literally cut off the lifeblood of this country. so that's the basis of what we've been doing and that's why we have an american legacy to her. .. and sense i've written three novels on george washington, what a better pattern than to weave these giants, ronald reagan, after whom the soviet empire disappeare
workers' union under president michael langford delivering brighter services and a brighter future find out more at uwua.net. viewpoint on current tv 8:00 p.m. with eliot spitzer. this man burns the candle at both ends. he is willing to join us at least once a week he does every wednesday morning to comment on the issues of the day. hey, elliott, good morning. >> good morning. burn it too much except one week i forgot to call in. other than that, we do okay. >> you are not that far from washington, but i am interested -- >> emotionally we are very far away. >> okay. i am interested even with the benefit of 500 miles how does this for the prospects for a deal on fiscal cliff look from your perspective? >> you know -- >> do you think it's going to happen. >> short answer is i don't know because i see two trends simultaneously. one, you hear voices in either party saying, hey, it wouldn't be so bad if we go over the cliff. some of the hysteria attendant to the whole notion of the cliff is being -- dissipating. on the other hand, if you look at the numbers, t
or not the tariff should be used to protect manufacturers and labor unions and workers or whether it should be used to raise revenue to pay the expenses of government. the republican doctrine was protection and the democratic party had a different view. you can see the ratchet up the 20th century. every time we had war goes back up. and then you see the kind of continuing ratcheting over the last 30 or 40 years. right now we're close to 25% of gpa in terms of federal spending. that is because the economy is awake but we have been spending a lot. there is some obvious parallels in the structure of these events that might provide some clues as to what we might look for in any new people. the pivotal events, jefferson's revolution and the crisis of the 1930's extended over section -- several election cycles. the cycles that emerged -- each segment ended with the ouster of the parties that had dominated during the previous year and each change brought in a new set of governing elite. immigrants were an important factor in some of these elections. certainly in the roosevelt coalition, immigrants were an
, and those in union city, new jersey, who have, you know, electorally expressed themselves via the democratic party. that goes to who engaged them when they showed up, and cultivated their political activity and included them in the political activity that was going on at that time no those communities. there's a lot to be said in in cycle and going forward as part of a broader koa litionz, and one -- coalition, and one that i heard time and time again, and republicans love to go back to the reagan quote. the national polls this year should not give you comfort. it's, you know, two-thirds support for abortion, and 60% support for the affordable care act. the -- about 59% for same-sex marriage. this is among hispanics in the national exit poll. that doesn't sound socially conservative to me. >> no. >> and so also, the question, it becomes, and this is more for the people who -- i'm not a -- dangerous thing to say, but the hispanic millennials more like millennials or hispanic millennials like traditional hispanics exist? >> save that thought. dig peeper, and sorry to put you on the spot on thi
made the announcement late last night. the tentative agreement between shipping companies and the union that represents 800 clerical workers came hours after federal mediators from washington joined the negotiations. the clerical workers went out on strike last week and dock workers refused to cross their picket lines. the strike cost the u.s. an estimated $1 billion a day. >>> the philippines reeling this morning from typhoon bopha. the deadly storm packing 110 miles an hour winds, triggering deadly floods and landslides in the southern part of the country. dozens of buildings have been destroyed. at least 133 people have been killed. that number is expected to rise. the storm is now moving toward the beach resorts in the northern part of the philippines. >>> here in the united states, we're getting our own taste of bad weather. meteorologist karen maginnis joins us live from atlanta with the very latest. good morning to you, karen. >> good morning, zoraida. we saw the back-to-back-to-back storms, four of them that ushered in that moisture. first of all, it produced that layer of cold
Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)